Tag Archives: ADHD drugs

New Liquid Medication available for ADHD Treatment

New Liquid Medication available for ADHD Treatment Many parents have asked countless times if their child’s ADHD medications came in liquid or chewable form. Usually, they asked because their kids had a problem swallowing the pills or capsules because they were either too big or tasted terrible. Now, the long awaited solution to one of the few problems of stimulant-type ADHD drug dosing-especially in younger children with ADHD is finally here… Yesterday, Pfizer pharmaceutical announced it was releasing an extended-release methylphenidate in oral suspension for treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. “Quillivant XR”, this first-ever liquid alternative to ADHD pills will be available in January 2013. Apparently, Quillivant has the very same effects and side-effects as pill or capsule form methylphenidate and a child who is currently being treated for ADHD using this drug would probably experience no changes with regard to changing from the pill to liquid formulation. I think the biggest concerns a parent and physician should have about using any liquid-suspension drug are: Since the drug comes in powder form and must be mixed with sterile water at the pharmacy, it is essential that it be mixed properly to avoid over-dosage or under-dosing. Whoever measures the medication… Read the rest

How to improve behavior in a child with ADHD

Changing an ADHD Child’s Behavior How to improve behavior in a child with ADHD As kids return to school to start the new academic year, more and more parents are asking for ways to change their ADHD child’s behavior. This usually means their ADHD child has poor behavior, has bad habits, or displays misbehavior and they want help in fixing it-the behavior. Common complaints about the behavior of a child with ADHD include: He doesn’t listen to me (pay attention to what I am saying or ignores me) She interrupts when I’m speaking (has to get the last word in) He won’t sit still in class (fidgets all the time-disrupts the class) She refuses to do her homework (I can’t get her to do her homework) He talks back to me all the time (has a smart mouth-is mouthy) She argues over everything or acts like she knows everything. As I’m sure you have noticed, all of these ADHD symptoms are really just typical behaviors or habits normally seen in ADHD kids and teens. They include the core symptoms used to make the diagnosis of ADHD-inattentiveness, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Daniel was the perfect example of an ADHD child’s behavior problemRead the rest

Successful Treatment of ADHD Kids may require Treating Parents

Successful Treatment of ADHD Kids may require Treating Parents Children with ADHD may not respond to therapy unless their ADHD parents are treated at the same time. It’s true…no matter how many drugs a child with ADHD takes, no matter how many counseling sessions he or she attends, no matter how many promises or threats a parent makes; sometimes the only way ADHD kids will respond to treatment is to treat their parent for ADHD. ADHD experts estimate 50% to 70% of all ADHD teenagers will still have one or more elements of their ADHD persisting into adulthood. Likewise, we’ve found 70% of all children and teenagers with ADHD will have one or both parents who are ADHD or had the core symptoms of ADHD during childhood. It is indeed very difficult to effectively diagnose and treat ADHD in a child when his or her mother or father have undiagnosed, misdiagnosed, or untreated ADHD. Most adults who fall into one of these three groups deny the existence of their ADHD, think they have “out-grown” their ADHD, or have serious subconscious doubts about whether ADHD is real or not. Denial of ADHD symptoms and doubts about whether ADHD is real or Read the rest

Medications for ADHD: Dangers of Addiction, Misuse and Abuse

Medications for ADHD: Dangers of Addiction, Misuse and Abuse Many readers have recently asked what happens when a child or adult who is not ADHD takes a drug for ADHD.  Most were concerned about the stimulant ADHD drugs such as methamphetamine or mixed salts amphetamines. It’s easy to understand their concern as many news print and broadcast articles have discussed the current epidemic of ADHD stimulant medication misuse and overuse. In fact, many cities have a big problem with women and men who use drugs like Adderall to lose weight or provide bursts of energy and stay awake for many hours at a time and college and high school students who use the same or a similar drug to help study for exams and improver grades. In some of these cities, users actually pay to attend parties or lectures where they learn how to fake the symptoms of ADHD in order to legally obtain ADHD drugs or how to buy or swap them with those who students who really have ADHD.. However, it seems the majority of these questions came about as a result of parents or spouses discovering their child or other loved one was taking a drug Read the rest

Problems sleeping cause ADHD Behavior in Children and Adults

Problems sleeping cause ADHD Behavior in Children and Adults Any “thing” that causes a problem sleeping can also cause a child or an adult to have signs and symptoms of ADHD. If you take a moment to think about it, it only makes sense that sleep disorders-regardless of the cause-can cause behavior often misdiagnosed as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Ten year-old Leslie was a perfect example of a child misdiagnosed with ADHD-who in fact was suffering disordered sleep. Leslie just seemed to be a tired, sleepy little girl when she first showed up in my office with her mom. Her teacher had urged her parents to have Leslie evaluated for ADHD, because “She had so many symptoms of ADHD behavior.” Ironically, her symptoms were poor concentration, poor attention span, and failure to complete assignments, falling asleep in class, failing grades, and acting as if she was in a daze. She was definitely not hyperactive and reportedly rarely impulsive. Several of these are indeed symptoms of ADHD, but not enough to make a true diagnosis. That’s what made Leslie’s behavior so confusing to her parents. She was tired….all the time, not just at school. Her parents… Read the rest

Diabetes Risk in ADHD Children Treated with Atypical Antipsychotics

ADHD children treated with atypical antipsychotics and antidepressants for depression or other behavior disorders are at greater risk for developing diabetes mellitus. While atypical antipsychotics are traditionally used to treat schizophrenia, I’ve found more and more doctors using them to treat bipolar disorder, agitated depression, anxiety associated with depression, major depressive disorder, oppositional behavior disorder, conduct disorder, and obsessive-compulsive behavior disorder. It’s currently estimated in excess of 40 children per 1000 children in the U.S. are being treated for one of the above behavior problem diagnoses using second generation (atypical) antipsychotics. This number has increased dramatically since 1996 at which point only about 9 out of 1000 kids ages 5 to 18 years were exposed to these drugs. Unfortunately, with increasing use of atypical antipsychotics and antidepressants, significant side effects of these medications are starting to pop up-the most concerning being diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes. A new study released in the December issue of the medical journal Pediatrics showed a four-fold increased risk of diabetes among children exposed to atypical antipsychotics and a little less in those treated with antidepressants. While the study doesn’t well-define the exact number of children, who develop diabetes as a result of exposure… Read the rest

Learning Styles Problems can cause Bad Grades in ADHD Children

Many children with ADHD have learning style problems that once corrected may lead to improved grades and academic performance. Quite often, children with ADHD have problems learning and remembering what they have learned, because of the principal traits of their ADHD behavior disorder; poor concentration and short attention span. Even when properly treated with ADHD medications, many of these kids and teens will continue to suffer bad grades and academic failure because ADHD drugs do not treat or cure learning problems. ADHD drugs are used to decrease impulsivity and improve concentration in hopes that by doing so, the ADHD child will be able to better learn. Many ADHD children will improve grades once treated with one of the medications for ADHD. However, if the child’s learning style does not match his or her learning experience, no amount of any drug will help improve those grades. What do I mean by “Learning Styles?” I’m sure you know friends and family who were “touchers”-they had to touch everything in order to understand what was going on or to learn a new skill. We call those persons “Kinesthetic learners” or “hands-on learners.” Kinesthetic learning is just one of several learning… Read the rest
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