Category Archives: Behavior training-coaching

Young ADHD children at Risk for Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

Young ADHD children at Risk for Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Young children with ADHD are probably more likely to engage in nonsuicidal self-injury than children who are not ADHD. Children with ADHD as a group are of course much more impulsive than children without ADHD. As most parents and teachers know, it’s that increased impulsivity that forms one of the core symptoms of ADHD and makes an accurate diagnosis of ADHD more likely. Increased impulsive behavior in ADHD is felt to be caused by inefficient executive brain processing of sensory input and the subsequent lack of an ADHD child’s or adult’s ability to delay gratification. It’s often this tendency to act before thinking through the consequences of doing something that gets the ADHD child, teen or adult in trouble. As I’ve previously pointed out, excessive and off-the-spur of the moment tattoos and body piercings tend to be good examples of impulsive ADHD nonsuicidal self-injury behavior (NSSI). However, quite a few parents would argue even one body piercing or tattoo was excessive and impulsive, but we won’t debate that opinion here. ADHD experts have realized over the past few years that adolescents with ADHD suffered higher rates of self-injury not related to suicidal… Read the rest

How to improve behavior in a child with ADHD

Changing an ADHD Child’s Behavior How to improve behavior in a child with ADHD As kids return to school to start the new academic year, more and more parents are asking for ways to change their ADHD child’s behavior. This usually means their ADHD child has poor behavior, has bad habits, or displays misbehavior and they want help in fixing it-the behavior. Common complaints about the behavior of a child with ADHD include: He doesn’t listen to me (pay attention to what I am saying or ignores me) She interrupts when I’m speaking (has to get the last word in) He won’t sit still in class (fidgets all the time-disrupts the class) She refuses to do her homework (I can’t get her to do her homework) He talks back to me all the time (has a smart mouth-is mouthy) She argues over everything or acts like she knows everything. As I’m sure you have noticed, all of these ADHD symptoms are really just typical behaviors or habits normally seen in ADHD kids and teens. They include the core symptoms used to make the diagnosis of ADHD-inattentiveness, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Daniel was the perfect example of an ADHD child’s behavior problemRead the rest

Successful Treatment of ADHD Kids may require Treating Parents

Successful Treatment of ADHD Kids may require Treating Parents Children with ADHD may not respond to therapy unless their ADHD parents are treated at the same time. It’s true…no matter how many drugs a child with ADHD takes, no matter how many counseling sessions he or she attends, no matter how many promises or threats a parent makes; sometimes the only way ADHD kids will respond to treatment is to treat their parent for ADHD. ADHD experts estimate 50% to 70% of all ADHD teenagers will still have one or more elements of their ADHD persisting into adulthood. Likewise, we’ve found 70% of all children and teenagers with ADHD will have one or both parents who are ADHD or had the core symptoms of ADHD during childhood. It is indeed very difficult to effectively diagnose and treat ADHD in a child when his or her mother or father have undiagnosed, misdiagnosed, or untreated ADHD. Most adults who fall into one of these three groups deny the existence of their ADHD, think they have “out-grown” their ADHD, or have serious subconscious doubts about whether ADHD is real or not. Denial of ADHD symptoms and doubts about whether ADHD is real or Read the rest

Medications for ADHD: When to change drug treatment

Medications for ADHD: When to change drug treatment Many things should be considered before changing an ADHD child’s medication. Failure to do so usually results in the child’s ADHD behavior or grades getting worse, leading to more frustration on the part of parents and teachers and even much more dread and gloom in your child. Parents often ask how they decide and when doctors need to change their ADHD kid’s or teen’s medications. Here are a few tips to lead you in the right direction: When it comes to your child’s ADHD behavior or grades: If they have improved by at least 75%, then he or she is responding to their ADHD therapy, regardless of what type it is. If they have not improved by at least 75% and they are being treated with only behavior therapy or ADHD coaching, then it’s time to consider drug therapy for their ADHD. If they have not improved by at least 75% and they are on one ADHD drug, consider increasing the dose until that goal is met or unbearable side effects rear their ugly heads. If that doesn’t work, some ADHD experts will change the medication… Read the rest

ADHD Impulsive Behavior and Risk of the Choking Game

ADHD impulsive behavior increases the risk of teens playing the choking game and what parents and teachers should watch for…. Impulsivity is one of the key symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as most of us who deal with children and teens with ADHD can readily attest. Sometimes, ADHD impulsive behavior can be of great benefit both for the person who is ADHD and for others around him or her. It’s often said that without impulsivity the world would have no great military leaders, no outstanding sports heroes, no successful entrepreneurs and maybe even a lot fewer doctors.  The reason is simple: Most of the great discoveries, most of the best inventions, most military endeavors, and most of the world’s most successful surgeons have one trait in common. They are risk takers and on top of it all, they are impulsive extreme risk takers. So, in some cases, impulsivity and risk taking behavior may benefit us all. Unfortunately though, not all risk takers are striving for advancement or betterment. Some impulsive boys and girls are engaging in risk taking behavior just for the sake of a quick high. The choking game played by preteens and teens is one such example of this… Read the rest

Using ADHD medications to improve self-esteem in ADHD children and teens

How to Build Self Esteem in ADHD Kids Five Using ADHD medications to improve self-esteem in ADHD children and teens It’s a simple fact: ADHD children and teens with ADHD cannot build self-esteem if they can’t concentrate on or pay attention to the visual, auditory and non-verbal cues that they must absorb in order to learn social skills and advance in academics. (Long sentence…but necessary to get it all out!) Everyone is quick to describe the child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as impulsive, poorly focused, having poor social skills and possibly hyperactive-driven to distraction. But they often forget the single most consistently occurring core symptom of ADHD is poor attention span or inattentiveness, not hyperactivity or impulsivity. In my experience, about 70% to 75% of kids with ADHD will need medication to help them focus better, pay better attention and decrease their impulsivity and hyperactivity so that they can learn all of those things needed to build self-esteem. The other 25% to 30% of ADHD children and teens will either get better with coaching or behavior training or will just go untreated. Once again I’d like to point out an untreated or undertreated child with ADHD will suffer multiple… Read the rest

How to Build Self Esteem in ADHD Kids Three

Finding a great coach for your child with ADHD Finding the perfect lifestyles coach for your ADHD child or teen isn’t as easy a job as you might think…and at the same time, you’d be surprised at the people you already know that make great coaches. This, our third article in the series “Building self-esteem in kids, whether ADHD or not” deals with the characteristics of a great ADHD behavior coach. And as you read to the end of the article, you’ll understand where to look for a coach and how to pick the best one for your child with ADHD. Between 14% and 17% of parents of ADHD behavior disordered children will choose treating their child’s behavior problem with this option-ADHD lifestyles coaching-instead of drugs or traditional cognitive behavioral training. Why? Because parents are increasingly worried about putting their children on ADHD drugs that often have many side-effects and really don’t “cure anything!”  Like yourself, these parents believe that training a child to recognize and manage his own behavior without medications gives the child a chance “to grow out of” or at least develop skills that let them control their ADHD traits by their late… Read the rest
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