Category Archives: Behavioral Therapy

Young ADHD children at Risk for Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

Young ADHD children at Risk for Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Young children with ADHD are probably more likely to engage in nonsuicidal self-injury than children who are not ADHD. Children with ADHD as a group are of course much more impulsive than children without ADHD. As most parents and teachers know, it’s that increased impulsivity that forms one of the core symptoms of ADHD and makes an accurate diagnosis of ADHD more likely. Increased impulsive behavior in ADHD is felt to be caused by inefficient executive brain processing of sensory input and the subsequent lack of an ADHD child’s or adult’s ability to delay gratification. It’s often this tendency to act before thinking through the consequences of doing something that gets the ADHD child, teen or adult in trouble. As I’ve previously pointed out, excessive and off-the-spur of the moment tattoos and body piercings tend to be good examples of impulsive ADHD nonsuicidal self-injury behavior (NSSI). However, quite a few parents would argue even one body piercing or tattoo was excessive and impulsive, but we won’t debate that opinion here. ADHD experts have realized over the past few years that adolescents with ADHD suffered higher rates of self-injury not related to suicidal… Read the rest

Adult ADHD and Anger

Adult ADHD and Anger When ADHD and anger are combined, the destruction to a person’s life is multiplied many times. At least 40% and as many as 60% of children with ADHD will still have symptoms of ADHD well into adult life. Of these Adults with ADHD, probably at least 50% will have problems with anger. ADHD experts feel that anger issues in ADHD adults often take two forms- problems controlling anger toward others or anger directed inwards-toward themselves. As many of us now realize, just being ADHD causes frustration and the doom of impending failure. Teachers often tell me of how ADHD kids just seem to give up when they appear overwhelmed and frustrated.  It’s often this frustration that causes ADHD children to fail at whatever they are doing. These failures just help perpetuate a cycle of frustration-failure-loss of confidence that further damages already fragile egos and self-esteem. Adults with ADHD suffer many of the very same behavior problems they had as children-poor concentration to detail, impulsivity, inattentiveness, but rarely show all of the elements of hyperactivity. Usually by age 25 to 30 most will have learned coping mechanisms that help control or suppress their outright hyperactivity.… Read the rest

How to improve behavior in a child with ADHD

Changing an ADHD Child’s Behavior How to improve behavior in a child with ADHD As kids return to school to start the new academic year, more and more parents are asking for ways to change their ADHD child’s behavior. This usually means their ADHD child has poor behavior, has bad habits, or displays misbehavior and they want help in fixing it-the behavior. Common complaints about the behavior of a child with ADHD include: He doesn’t listen to me (pay attention to what I am saying or ignores me) She interrupts when I’m speaking (has to get the last word in) He won’t sit still in class (fidgets all the time-disrupts the class) She refuses to do her homework (I can’t get her to do her homework) He talks back to me all the time (has a smart mouth-is mouthy) She argues over everything or acts like she knows everything. As I’m sure you have noticed, all of these ADHD symptoms are really just typical behaviors or habits normally seen in ADHD kids and teens. They include the core symptoms used to make the diagnosis of ADHD-inattentiveness, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Daniel was the perfect example of an ADHD child’s behavior problemRead the rest

New Learning Resource for ADHD Children Now Available

New Learning Resource for ADHD Children Now Available Amazing Grades, Pat Wyman’s Compilation of learning experts is now available at Amazon.com Here’s a description…. Amazing Grades is a worldwide goodwill book with 101 best-selling authors and experts, from 13 countries around the world, sharing their strategies for getting better grades faster. It is the result of a year’s collaboration by those 101 authors and is the first book ever to include 3 learning style strategies so that help students master the information in their own style and improve their grades faster. There are video strategies, (scan tags which include related videos); auditory strategies (all authors read their chapters aloud) and kinesthetic strategies so that students can interact with the material in the book. In addition, the book contains life skills strategies in all areas that affect student achievement as well as learning strategies that outline specifics on: How to decrease study time by at least half by using picture maps How to get motivated in 5 minutes or less How to get rid of learning roadblocks using these 5 specifics How to read faster than you ever thought possible How to handle any special learning differences such ADHD How… Read the rest

Successful Treatment of ADHD Kids may require Treating Parents

Successful Treatment of ADHD Kids may require Treating Parents Children with ADHD may not respond to therapy unless their ADHD parents are treated at the same time. It’s true…no matter how many drugs a child with ADHD takes, no matter how many counseling sessions he or she attends, no matter how many promises or threats a parent makes; sometimes the only way ADHD kids will respond to treatment is to treat their parent for ADHD. ADHD experts estimate 50% to 70% of all ADHD teenagers will still have one or more elements of their ADHD persisting into adulthood. Likewise, we’ve found 70% of all children and teenagers with ADHD will have one or both parents who are ADHD or had the core symptoms of ADHD during childhood. It is indeed very difficult to effectively diagnose and treat ADHD in a child when his or her mother or father have undiagnosed, misdiagnosed, or untreated ADHD. Most adults who fall into one of these three groups deny the existence of their ADHD, think they have “out-grown” their ADHD, or have serious subconscious doubts about whether ADHD is real or not. Denial of ADHD symptoms and doubts about whether ADHD is real or Read the rest

Children with ADHD at Risk for Bullying and Self Harm

Children with ADHD at Risk for Bullying and Self Harm ADHD experts have long known that children, teens and adults with ADHD are at increased risk for bullying at school, work and even at home. Unfortunately, a recent study showed children bullied by peerswhen they are younger are up to three times more likely to harm themselves in adolescence.” Researchers followed 1,116 sets of twins from 1994 to 1995 until their twelfth birthday and discovered almost 8% of those who were victims of frequent bullying deliberated tried to harm themselves. In contrast, only 2% of those who were not bullied tried self-harming behaviors. Observed self-harming behaviors included: Attempted suicide by strangulation Cutting arms Biting body parts Banging their head against walls And pulling out clumps of hair. In our practice, we have seen kids who deliberated excessively tattooed parts of their body as a result of the stress of being bullying. One teenage girl told me she had done so in hopes her tormentors would leave her alone because they would think she was crazy. Another bully-abused teen in our practice explained he tattooed his arms to keep from “slicing and dicing them with my knife.”  His tattoos… Read the rest

Anger issues can be part of ADHD

Anger issues can be part of ADHD Many ADHD children and adults have problems with anger. After all, many times anger occurs as a result of poor impulsivity control. If you can’t delay an impulsive action, then it’s hard to delay the feelings that often escalate to frustration and anger. It’s not unusual for both parents and doctors to assume that anger results from being spoiled, from lack of discipline, as a side effect of bipolar disorder or depression, or one or more of dozens of other problems. Sometimes the fact that anger can often be a part of the behavior of ADHD goes unrecognized. Other times, I suspect it becomes a subject of gross denial, as parents and healthcare professionals try to sort through the many causes of anger. ADHD experts point out all of the frustration that children and adults with ADHD have to suffer is one of the major reasons for anger in these persons. Why? It’s hard enough for a child or teen who is not ADHD to deal with frustration and failure, but just think about how difficult it is for the ADHD kid, teen or adult. As a result, ADHD anger can keep… Read the rest
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